Protecting tropical rainforests in Vanuatu

Khole, Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu
Avoided deforestation
$
12.00
tonne / person / mo

Overview

Protecting the coastal rainforests of Vanuatu's largest island together with the Serakar Clan of indigenous ni-Vanuatu landowners of the area. The clan consists of five extended families of some 50 individuals descended from Chief Serakar. This projects aims to help protect the forest by supporting these communities financially through carbon offsetting. This protects the native flora and endangered fauna and avifauna. As well as help preserve the land and stunning coast line from erosion during tropical storms.

Key benefits

🌴 Protecting the remaining 10% of native rainforest from logging or agricultural use

πŸ‘¨πŸ‘©πŸ‘§ Supporting indigenous families

🦜 Preserving natural habitat for endemic bird species

β›ˆ Reduces the erosive effects of tropical storms and cyclones

πŸ”–Legally binding rainforest protection agreement with authorities and local clan

Type
Avoided deforestation
Co-benefits
Agroforestry
Location
Khole, Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu
Size (km)
3 km2
Size (ha)
293 ha
Tree planted (so far)
>9.2 million
Project owner(s)
Serakar Clan, subgroup of Khole Community (Ser-Thiac Business (landowner business entity)
Project coordinators
Live & Learn Vanuatu Nakau
Standard
Plan Vivo
Registry
Markit Environmental Registry
Certifier
CPMA International (Sweden)
Key supporters
European Union
Technical document
Download here
Sustainable Development Goals

Project story

In the South Pacific Ocean on Vanuatu's largest island, Espiritu Santo, lies a beautiful area of tropical rainforest along the Loru coast. It's one of the islands last stands of lowland rainforest on the East Coast of Espiritu Santo. The aim of the project is to protect the coastal rainforest from deforestation and forest degradation.

90% of the forest on this island has been cleared for commercial coconut plantations. Previously, this area of land was a mix of intact and degraded forest area, there was regular extraction of timber and wildlife and in some parts there was also cattle ranching within forest area itself.

Today, this coastal rainforest provides habitat for the critically endangered Vanuatu Megapode bird and the critically endangered Coconut Crab. It is also home to several endemic bird species including the Vanuatu Kingfisher, the Vanuatu Flycatcher, the Vanuatu Fruit Dove, the Vanuatu White-eye, the Santo Mountain Starling, the Vanuatu Imperial Pigeon, and the Golden Whistler.

The project is owned by the Serakar Clan of indigenous ni-Vanuatu landowners of Loru, Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu. The clan consists of five extended families of some 50 individuals descended from Chief Serakar (1913-1997).

Loru holds great cultural significance to the clan. However, with ever increasing economic burden and pressure on the community to develop and clear the land for non-forest use, such as coconut plantations and cattle grazing that already occur in the surrounding areas, it becomes difficult to say no. A common problem throughout developing nations. This is where this project steps in to help support these indigenous communities and protect rainforests from being cut down.

The landowners have given up rights to clear land for coconut plantations and other clearing activities, in exchange for the opportunity to sell rainforest carbon offsets, that you are looking at now. Think of this like a legally binding agreement for protecting forests. This generates revenue for local people and keeps the forests how they are and need to be to help mitigate climate change.

Communities manage the land more carefully, by clearing thicket and aggressive species such as herbaceous vines to enhance natural regeneration and rehabilitate of degraded areas.

The project also provides management and governance support to help the communities to develop community businesses based on agroforestry produce, such as different fruit, nuts, root and timber crops. This provides long-term economic support for the landowners to manage the rainforest conservation. The first of which is a community business producing and selling agroforestry produced Melanesian Chestnut (Canarium nuts) from nearby non-forest land areas that have been infested with invasive vines.

By supporting this project you are helping to protect natural coastal rainforests and wildlife species, while also supporting the Serakar Clan of Vanuatu.

No items found.
Social benefits
  • Financial support from carbon offsets for the Kole Village and local communities
  • Alternative, sustainable and long-term sources of income from the sale of β€” nuts, fruit, timber and root produce in adjacent areas overrun by aggressive non-forest species
  • A culturally significant area for the clan, now legally protected and cared for
  • The Loru coastal rainforest is protected as a Community Conservation Area under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act (2010)
  • Education and learning on correct forest protection from invasive species and land management to yield the highest amount of carbon sequestration
Ecological benefits
  • Preserving the native rainforest tree and plant species for the future
  • One of the last remaining areas of native forest on Vanuatu's main island, with 90% of native forests already cut down for coconut plantations
  • Agroforestry in non-forest and invasive species areas with diverse species creates a healthier biodiversity with nuts, fruit, timber and root produce.
  • Habitat for the critically endangered bird species, including the Vanuatu Megapode and the critically endangered Coconut Crab and several native birds including the Vanuatu Kingfisher, the Vanuatu Flycatcher, the Vanuatu Fruit Dove, the Vanuatu White-eye, the Santo Mountain Starling, the Vanuatu Imperial Pigeon, and the Golden Whistler.
  • Rainforest area is protected as a Community Conservation Area under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act (2010) in Vanuatu
Project location

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